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Hosting A Multicultural Wedding? 3 Ways To Help Guests Love It

Most couples would agree that wedding planning is a challenge. It becomes even more work when the couple and their families represent different cultures, ethnicities, or religious beliefs. What should you do to make your multicultural wedding a success for you and for all your loved ones? Here are 3 tips to help guests enjoy it even more.

Explain Aspects To Guests

If many of your guests will not be familiar with parts of the wedding, either on the bride's side or the groom's side, find ways to make them feel informed and excited. Start by including a small statement or explanation in invitations, or by email to guests. If any guests will participate, help them understand what it means to you. 

Having wedding activities during the days or week before the big day? Take this time to introduce guests to any special parts of the ceremony or party so that they will enjoy these when they occur. Finally, include a short explanation of traditions like jumping the broom or breaking glass as they occur. 

Provide Food Options

Serving wedding food with a multicultural flair is a big part of the day for many couples. But if your guests aren't used to the menu, be kind and provide a few more traditional dishes. This could include offering vegetarian or gluten free options as well as providing some kid-friendly choices for picky little ones. 

Of course, you don't have to put hamburgers and French fries on the menu next to your Ethiopian injera bread. Work with your caterer to come up with some complementary stew or chicken alternatives that pair well with the doro wat instead. Label all the dishes, including ingredients, on the menu or at the buffet. Your welcoming approach just might convert some nonbelievers into loves of international cuisine. Work with a catering company to help you with this.

Have a Statement Piece

You don't need to go overboard making every aspect of your ceremony and reception all about your different cultures or backgrounds. Instead, focus on a few "statement" activities or decorations. Whatever you choose, guests will remember the fun or romance of a big statement without it overpowering your nuptials. 

What focal point should you plan? It could be a traditionally red first gown for a Chinese bride or an Indian bride's pre-wedding mehndi party. Your bridal party may want to perform a hula or haka at your reception. Send guests home with Brazilian bem casados as a wedding favor. Incorporate an ancient tradition like the Japanese san-san-kudo into your ceremony. Or, encourage guests to sneak a kiss when a Swedish bride or groom leaves their partner alone in the room. 

No matter what aspects of your and your partner's cultures you choose to highlight at your wedding, it's sure to bring an extra spark to your perfect day. 

About Me

Most people don't realize it, but there is a way to cook the wrong meals for others--even if you are innately familiar with their personal preferences and culture. Although I am far from an expert, I started studying proper cooking traditions a few years ago, and it has really helped me to enjoy a whole new perspective on things. I wanted to begin a blog that talked all about food and cooking, so that you can understand the deeper levels of what it means to make a great dish. Check out these posts for all kinds of helpful information on everything from cooking to serving.

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